Kuklis's Bar on Birkbeck St.

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History of Freeland, Pa.
Restaurants, bars, soda fountains, hangouts


[The photo at top left was taken by me or my brother Steve during a walk around town, probably in the fall of 1982. All other photos by Chuck and Steve Tancin, except for Balon's Bar interior from Frank Balon, Genie Boyle's from Bill Smith, Kostick's and Northside Pizzeria from Ed Merrick, Procopio's from John Zubach, and Remak's from Nancy Penn.]

Additions from the 1940 Federal Census come to us courtesy of Ed Merrick. In some instances, it's not clear whether the individual is the owner/proprietor of the store or an employee, but we'll list them here. Some of the addresses from the 1940 Census might be home addresses rather than business addresses. He adds: The handwriting was hard to decipher in many instances, and so corrections are welcome. Many of the businesses have been in the same family for years, and so the first names may differ in earlier or later years.


RESTAURANTS, SODA FOUNTAINS, HANGOUTS, CIGAR STORES

See Recreation page for Pool, Billiards, Bowling

[Thanks to Jack Polachak, Beth Learn, Ed Merrick, Bill Feissner, Eddie Barna, Ann Swankowski for additions and corrections.]

Amentler's - 457 Ridge Street (Rocco Amentler, proprietor), merchant, restaurant (age 28 in 1940 Census)

Balas Distributing - East South Street (Freeland/White Haven Highway) (from 1986 St. Casimir's booklet via Ed Merrick)

Belekanich's - 409 Ridge St. (Anna Belekanich, proprietor) (age 32 in 1940 Census)

Bonner's Restaurant - 420 Centre Street (John and Bryan Bonner, proprietors) (ages 36 and 41 in 1940 Census)

Tommy Bzdil's BBQ Restaurant - 452 Centre St. (Tom Bzdil, Sr., proprietor)

Chonko's Cigars - 336 Centre St., between Carbon & Luzerne Streets (George "Happy" Chonko, proprietor)

The Coffee Pot - 529 Centre St. (Gus Spiel, proprietor) (From Bill Feissner: The Gus Spiel business referred to was in the Gus Spiel building and was known as "The Coffee Pot". It was run by Chris Spiel (maiden name). She later married Tom Fedorshak, and they both ran it till closing and they moved to Florida.)

Site of Dot's
                Restaurant Cozy Corner (a.k.a. Ratsie's) - Ridge & North (?) Streets

Cunningham's Restaurant - Centre St., between Main & South Streets

Dot's Restaurant - Centre St., between South & Luzerne Streets (Dot Myers, proprietor)

Eddie's Bar and Restaurant - 421 Centre St. (1975-1989) (Eddie Barna, proprietor) (From Bill Feissner: Carcia's Bar was sold to Ed Barna and became Eddie's Bar. He bought the Eagles next door and made a large dining room out of it. He then retired and sold it to Jackie and Leanne Kochie, which is now The Other Side.) (From Eddie Barna: Gauzís Furniture Store at 423 Centre Street was in operation through the mid-1940s. The Eagles bought the building in the late 1940ís and remodeled it for their Club, which they used until 1984. I bought it and used the first floor for my main dining room and the second floor was used for private parties. It is currently the Other Side Bar & Restaurant.)

Fairchild's Luncheonette - 628 Centre St. (Elwood Fairchild, proprietor), merchant, confectionery; Howard Fairchild, 924 Walnut St., chef of confectionery (ages 26 and 45 in 1940 Census)

Fairchild's News Stand - 712 Centre St. (Walter Fairchild, proprietor) (age 49 in 1940 Census)

Famalette's Pizza - 542 Centre St. (Anthony Famalette, proprietor) (From Eddie Barna: In the building north of Balon's Bar, (the Gallagher building, I think ...), there was a photographer during the late 40's and early 50's. I don't remember the name, but maybe one of your readers will remember. After this business closed, Tony Famalette opened a pizzeria and was there for a couple of years. Some may remember the heat from the pizza oven causing the wall to push out towards Main Street.)

Feist Cigars - 929 Washington St. (Russell Feist, proprietor), cigar maker, own place (age 45 in 1940 Census)

Gunning's Restaurant - 513 Centre St. (Patrick Gunning, proprietor and waiter) (age 60 in 1940 Census)

Guzzi's Restaurant - 831 South St. (Anthony Guzzi, proprietor) merchant, restaurant (age 48 in 1940 Census) (CT: in city directory listed at 831 South St. - ??)

Karpowich's Restaurant - 329 Centre St. (Edward Karpowich, proprietor and waiter) (age 36 in 1940 Census) This was the former site of Joseph Greshko's restaurant and bar.

Learn's Lunch and Soda Fountain - 722 Centre St. (Harvey "Pop" Learn, proprietor) (From Beth Learn: My cousin was given a xerox of an article with the headline: "Recall 'Pop' Learn's?" Here's the first few paragraphs, word for word: Freelanders, remember Harvey "Pop" Learn's Lunch and Soda Fountain at 722 Centre St.? The site is now the Welsh building. "Pop" Learn's was the mecca in the mid and late thirties as the "popular hangout" for Freeland High students and basketball players -- everyone went to "Pop" Learn's."  Pop Learn was probably my Dad's Dad or my Grandfather Harvey Simon Learn. I was not aware that he had such a mecca but that would coincide with my Dad in HS etc.)

Marion's Restaurant - Centre St. between Carbon and Luzerne streets (From Bill Feissner: Marion's Restaurant became Jabo's Bar, then was sold by Jabo to an Indian named Mushie, and became the Rustic Lounge.)

Mehales' Restaurant - 449 Ridge St. (John Mehales, proprietor) merchant, restaurant (age 49 in 1940 Census)

Miskevich's Restaurant - 360 Ridge St. (William Miskevich) merchant, restaurant (age 46 in 1940 Census)

Mischissen's Restaurant - 402 Centre St. (Michael Mischissen, proprietor) merchant, restaurant, home at 443 Ridge St. (age 50 in 1940 Census)

Mulhearn's Restaurant & Bar - 637 Centre St. (Joseph L. Mulhearn) employer, restaurant (1940 Census)

Myers Cigars - 436 Centre Street (John Myers, proprietor) - with Tom Bzdil? - cigar store (age 41 in 1940 Census)

Noke's Noke's Noke's Noke's Noke's - Centre St. (Formerly Woodie's; closed in 2009? These photos show that many of the fixtures from Woodie's were still in use by Noke's.)




Kostick's
                and North Side Pizzeria Northside Pizzeria - 326 Centre St., and also previously at 355 Centre St. (From Ed Merrick: This photo shows Kostick's Bar and Grill (left) and the North-Side Pizzeria at 355 Centre Street, where our grocery store used to be, on February 1, 1966.)

Northside Restaurant - Centre St., between Luzerne & South Streets

Remak's Restaurant - 709 Main St. (John Remak, proprietor) (From E. Merrick: "John Remak (my uncle), proprietor. My grandfather, Mike Remak, started this business. Early on, he also distributed beer from a horse-drawn wagon. My grandfather also had two stores-on-wheels, which were driven by my dad, Tony Merrick, and my uncles, Mickey and George.")

Sorrento's Russell's Ice Cream Shop - Centre St., between Front & Main Streets

William Selvestrovich - 731 Front Street, proprietor, employer, restaurant (age 48 in 1940 Census)

Sophie's Luncheonette - 442 Centre St., between South & Luzerne Streets (Sophie Karpowich, proprietor; now the Northside Restaurant)

Sorrento Restaurant & Pizzeria - 462 Centre St.

Subway - Centre and South Streets, with Nocchi's Pharmacy

The Sugar Bowl (Gus Stenopolis?) - Centre St., between Main & South Streets

Timesquare - Centre St., near the Borough Building (Vic Piazzi, proprietor) (From Ann Swankowski: Getting to my father's store. I believe he opened it in the early forties. It was called TIMESQUARE. It was originally  located below Joe Rish's Barber shop and the Daddy purchased the building on the corner (directly across from the ELKS)  He had the store downstairs and made an apt. upstairs for his brother and his wife. The store was a great hangout for all the men. He sold candy  and cigars, but it was known as a cigar store, so whatever else they sold I really don't remember. They did a lot of politicking there and when television first came out he had one in the window. People would go uptown and stand outside to watch TV. As far as I remember it was a popular place and a great hangout. It was not open during the day. Daddy was paymaster at Jeddo Highland Coal Co. He would open up after he had his supper until about midnight.)

Ursta's - 451 Ridge St. (John Ursta, proprietor) merchant, restaurant (age 54 in 1940 Census)

Site of Doc
                Welsh's Site of
                Woodie's Doc Welsh's - 722 Centre St. (Cornelius Welsh, proprietor) (From Ed Merrick: "The Largest and Most Expensive Soda Fountain in Freeland." I suspect they meant that the soda fountain equipment, and not the ice cream sodas, was the most expensive in Freeland.)

Woodie's Fountain and Luncheonette - 632 Centre St. (From Ed Merrick: Brothers Woodie and Pal (Elwood and Robert) Whitehead, proprietors; head waitress was Carmelita Ricotta; "Mom" Dietrich was the cook) (Dolly Madison Ice Cream, Fisher's Homemade Chocolate, Novelties ('52 Minamek)); ("Where friends meet to eat." ('53 Minamek)). (See the photos of Noke's, above. Was Woodie's formerly Fairchild's?)

Yeskevich's Restaurant - 449 Centre St. (Magdelina Yeskevich, proprietor), merchant, restaurant (age 43 in 1940 Census) (CT: Magdalena in city directory)

BEER DISTRIBUTORS

Belekanich's sign
[Thanks to Charles Rudewick, Aileen Mattavi Evans, Ed Merrick, Cal Herring for additions and corrections.]

Belekanich's - 409 Ridge St. (Michael Belekanich, proprietor) (From Cal Herring: Belekanich - behind the bar - I remember his delivery truck parked in that empty lot next to his building) ; in 1940 Census, distributor, beer company, listed at 353 Ridge Street (age 56 in 1940 Census)

Porter from
                Freeland Brewing Co. Freeland Brewing Company - Fern St., between South & Main Streets (closed 1933) (From Ed Merrick, citing CS)

Laputka's - 636 Fern St. (George Laputka, proprietor), salesman, brewery (age 27 in 1940 Census) (From Cal Herring: Laputka's in the 600 block of Fern St. in the alley with Vine St. (used to distribute Schaeffer)

Mattavi Bros. - 901 Pine, at Pine and Chestnut Streets (Pete and Joe Mattavi, proprietors) (they also delivered; in business until around 1965?)

Frank Rudy - 531 Fern Street, distributor, brewery (age 47 in 1940 Census) (Mrs. Mary Rudy instead of Frank in 1940 city directory)

Paul Yori - Walnut St. (until around 1961?)

D.G Yuengling & Son's Beer Depot - 615 South Street, a few doors east of Washington St., noted on maps from 1900, 1905 and 1912 (From Eddie Barna, who wrote to the Yuengling beer company to ask about this business and got this reply: Beer depots were used as drop off points for the beer. They would deliver the beer by wagon and then drop them off at a beer depot for someone else to take it further. This way they wouldn't spoil. The beer depots kept them cold.)


BARS, BREWERIES, BOTTLING WORKS

[Thanks to Aileen Mattavi Evans, Maggie Farina, B. & J. Kulig, Ed Cheppa Sr., Eddie Barna, Sam Drozic, Charlie Rudewick, Ed Merrick, Jolene Lavinka Szymanski, Lorraine Potochney, Jack Polachak, Nancy Penn, Carolyn Moering, Pat Ferko Miller, Tom Lavinka, Jerry and Betty Kulig, Bill Feissner, Maggie Farina, Nicole Drozic Ashmore, Peter J. Curry, Mike Bobby, Joe Benish, Frank Balon, Jolene Lavinka Szymanski for additions and corrections.]

Al's Blue Pines - Freeland/White Haven Highway (now Jimbo's Party Beverages?)

Balon's Bar,
                1920s Balon's Bar &
                Grill Balon's Bar & Grill - 536-538-540 Centre St. (Frank Balon, proprietor, and later Stanley Balon until closing in 1999) (From Frank Balon in 2005, relaying information from his father Stanley: Dad thinks that my grandfather Frank Balon, of Polish descent, began the business around 1910, taking over a bar that was already in existence. He had arrived in the U.S. around 1892-1896. In the early years of the bar, mostly drinks were served, but Frank Balon was also known for making large pots of soup. He ran a boarding house/rooming house upstairs above the bar. I think miners stayed there. There are stories that I recall of Dad's older sisters having to wash miners' clothes, and leaving a mouse in miner's shoe. In fact, we still had the rooming house through my years, at least until around 1980. I recall as many as 5 roomers at a time. Dad was born in 1919 and took over running the bar when he returned from WW2, but Frank was still in the picture until his death in the mid-1950's. I helped out with the bar for a bit in the early 1980s, tending bar and doing short-order cooking - hamburgs, cheeseburgs, steak sandwiches. But Pop made the BEST burgers in town. Our family has always lived in the same building where the bar is. In the period when Pop ran the bar there were also other businesses renting space in the building. There was a butcher shop next door. In the "side-room" off the bar, in my time, was a room for parties or meetings. During the 70's, we partitioned half of this side room off: we kept 1/2 for meetings and the front half, which opened out to Centre St. (actual address 540), was a beauty shop. Around mid 80's we rented this out to an Insurance Adjuster, Carl Pecora. Mr. Pecora's nephew, Larry Yori, still runs this buisness from there. He probably uses the 536 address however.) (From Frank Balon, April 2010: this is a picture inside Balon's Bar from sometime in the 1920's. Behind the bar is Grandfather Frank Balon.  The tin ceiling and cedar bar are still there today.)

Belekanich's Belekanich's - Ridge St., between South & Luzerne Streets (former schoolhouse) (From Ed Merrick: "Mrs. Belekanich was proprietor, and the bartender was her son, Francis Hill. She made the most wonderful giant meatballs and French fries, and you could order as many meatballs as you thought you could handle. The only beer on tap was Ortlieb's, brewed in Philadelphia. My friends and I would go in, crowd into one of the wonderful private little rooms (it once indeed was a school), and feast and drink to our hearts' content. The Belekaniches lived in the lovely old home with the wraparound porch at Ridge and Luzerne.")

Bessie Boyle's - 705 South St.

Big Al's - across from Balas's on South Street (Al Petrusky, proprietor)

Big Bill's Bar - Front St., between Centre & Washington Streets, next to Shane's Sporting Goods

BZ's Bar - Centre St. below South St. (Barbara Znachko, proprietor)

Carsia's Bar - Centre St. below South St. (From Bill Feissner: Carcia's Bar was sold to Ed Barna and became Eddies Bar. He bought the Eagles next door and made a large dining room out of it. He then retired and sold it to Jackie and Leanne Kochie, which is now The Other Side.)

Chatterbox - Freeland-White Haven highway

Cheppa's Cafe - 418 Centre St. (George Cheppa, proprietor)

Cherone's Bar & Grille - 637 Centre St (1952 phone book)

Clover Bar Clover Bar Clover Bar - 400 Ridge St. (Jack Amentler, proprietor, and his wife, Annelle, cook.) (From Ed Merick: If I could have back all the hours I spent there, I would be a young man again, but I wouldn't want them, they were so wonderful. The place was a refuge for me and my friends during those long, dismal winters. It was where the guy and girls from MMI, Freeland High, Foster, and St. Ann's got together and had fun and feasted. Nellie was a great cook, and every night we spent there was capped with a feast: spaghetti and homemade meatballs for 75 cents, steak for $1.50, and lobster tail for $1.75.) (From Chuck Tancin: I've been told by someone else that in the 1930s people used to bring their cows to graze in the lot that the Clover Bar was later built on - grazing on clover, maybe?)

Chi Chi DeFalco's - 722 South St. (Frank DeFalco, proprietor and operator) (age 43 in 1940 Census)

Dovan's Den - Centre St., between South & Luzerne Streets

Drozic's - Ridge & South Streets  (Sam Drozic, Sr. 1965-1972 and then Sam Drozic, Jr., 1973-1978, proprietors) (From Sam Drozic, Jr.: Before me, my parents ran it from 1965. They bought it from Tony and Lucille Prett who bought it in 1962. The previous owner called by his nickname "Tuggles". His last name was Broskoski. No one knows when Tuggles bought it from the original owner, Antonio Guzzi, who built it. He imported Italian marble for the floor and had a big safe with his name on it in gold. I'd say Guzzi probably started it around the turn of the century and ran it until Tuggles bought it, probably after the war.)

Eagle's Club - 423 Centre St.

Eddie's Bar and Restaurant - 421 Centre St. (1975-1989) (Eddie Barna, proprietor) (From Bill Feissner: Carcia's Bar was sold to Ed Barna and became Eddie's Bar. He bought the Eagles next door and made a large dining room out of it. He then retired and sold it to Jackie and Leanne Kochie, which is now The Other Side.) (From Eddie Barna: Gauzís Furniture Store at 423 Centre Street was in operation through the mid-1940s. The Eagles bought the building in the late 1940ís and remodeled it for their Club, which they used until 1984. I bought it and used the first floor for my main dining room and the second floor was used for private parties. It is currently the Other Side Bar & Restaurant.)

E.J.'s - Centre & Luzerne Streets (formerly Kostick's)

Fearnots Pub - Green St. (From Bill Feissner: the firehouse bar on Green St. was called The Fearnots Pub. It had a regular bar license that was later sold to the Wooden Nickle.)

Bubsy Ferdinand's - 977 Walnut St., at Vine and Walnut (From Maggie Farina: I think at one time it was a boarding house/hotel/dance hall I'm guessing around sometime in the early 30's or even earlier.)

Fox Bottling Works - 25 Park St. in 1928 (John C. Fox, proprietor) soda factory ; 353 Park St. in 1940 (age 59 in 1940 Census) (From Carolyn Moering: John C. Fox, brother of Julius Fox, the baker, owned Fox Bottling Works , Park St, Freeland. They bottled birch beer soda.)

Freeland Brewing Company - Fern St., between South & Main Streets (closed 1933)

Gallagher's - Ridge & Carbon Streets (From Pete Curry: My ancesters, the Gallaghers, operated a saloon in Freeland at Ridge & Carbon from approximately 1895 until approximately 1920, at which time they moved to Newark, NJ. My father Edward J Curry spent many summers as a child with Gallagher relatives in Sandy Valley, and often went to Freeland by buggy to visit the "Freeland Gallaghers.")

Genie
                Boyle's Genie Boyle's - Washington & Main Streets (From Aileen Mattavi Evans: Gene Boyle was my uncle and on St. Paddy's day he would do the Irish Jig on the bar. Big shindigs there on St. Paddy's day.) This photo comes from Bill Smith, cropped from a photo on the Post Offices page showing preparation of ground for building the current post office in the mid-1930s.

Grega's - 525 Fern St. (George Grega, proprietor) (1940 Census)

Hudak - 406 Washington St. (John Hudak) bottler, beverage company (age 35 in 1940 Census)

Jabbo's Bar - Centre St., between Luzerne & Carbon Streets, owned by Jabbo Valkusky (From Bill Feissner: Marion's Restaurant became Jabbo's Bar, then was sold by Jabbo to an Indian named Mushie, and became the Rustic Lounge.) (From Mike Bobby: Jabbo Valkusky's bar was located on Centre Street near Carbon. My friend's father was a bartender in the early 70s. It was known as The Rustic Lounge in the late 80s and early 90s and run by an Indian gentleman from Bensalem, Pa. known as "Mushie" until his untimely death at the age of 53 in 1992. The building remained vacant and was gutted by a fire in Sept. 2000.)

Kasarda's - 330 Centre St. (John Kasarda, proprietor) merchant, restaurant (age 49 in 1940 Census)

Kostick's - Centre & Luzerne Streets (later became E.J.'s in the 1980s) (John and Betty (Kushmider) Kostick, proprietors)

Trudy Kozel's - 527 Centre St.

Kuklis's Bar Kuklis's - 1033 Birkbeck St. (From Billy Kuklis: Here's the history about my dad's bar. My Grandfather (Anthony) and Grandmother (Catherine) Kuklis started the bar on Birkbeck Street sometime in the early 1930's. My Grandfather died in 1935 and my Grandmother ran the bar with the help of my father until 1965 when my Grandmother died; then my father (William) and my Mother (Lucy) operated the bar until 1987 when my dad died and the bar was then closed for good. The bar was a small friendly neighborhood gathering place where everyone knew everyone and they got together to chat about what was going on around town. It had two rooms, the first room is where the bar was located and it had eight bar stools, a large card table with chairs and two small card tables with chairs. The second room had a dining room table with chairs and two small card tables with chairs. Also, the Kuklis Bar was the first bar in Freeland to have a Color TV. My Uncle John worked for RCA in New Jersey in the late 1950's and purchased one for the bar in 1958 or 1959. We also had a large antenna on our roof to get the New York and Philadelphia channels years before cable.)


Letchak's - 420 Centre St. (George Letchak, proprietor)

Masley's - 457 Hemlock St. (Mike Masley, proprietor) (From Mary Ann Rosetta Schaeffer: My Uncles' store was named, I think "Masley's" store and the entrance was on South St. It was part of their home. The bar was on the other side of the house in the living room area and the pool hall was in the house across the yard and the back was on the alley road. The home had a stone wall facing South St. I believe it was 3 houses within one area, and all those places are still there)

Jakie Mattis's Bar Jakie Mattis's - 360 Centre St. (John Mattis, proprietor) (age 42 in 1940 Census) (From Ed Merrick: Leona was Jakie's wife and had her shop above and behind the barroom. She also did the cooking for the bar. On many a Saturday night we sent across the street for her delicious turkey platters, her Saturday night special. When I was a kid, I remember the miners getting off the bus in the morning and heading over to Jakie's for a shot and a beer to cut the coal dust. Breakfast of champions it was not, but the "breakfast" of hard-working men risking their lives and health daily to support their families.)

Mitchell's - Rte. 940? (From Joe Benish: My father was also a Joseph Benish, who was born in a "company house" in Milnesville, outside Hazleton and grew up in Freeland. In fact, he often bragged that he was for years the usher at one of the Freeland Theaters (not sure which one) until he went into the Army. His aunt and uncle Michael Mitchell once owned a great old tavern in the woods, adjacent to an old dance hall on the outskirts of town. I remember going there as a child - the entire tavern was lined in beautiful knotty pine (that may have even been its name - or it was known simply as "Mitchell's") and they lived in a small home adjacent. I remember the U-shaped driveway that led into the woods from the main road (Rte. 940?) to their home and bar, and the old dance hall being several hundred yards away in the woods. We used to play there as children. In 1996 I paid a brief visit to Freeland and was told the site where the bar and dance hall were is now a lumberyard.)

Molly Mulhearn's - Front St., between Centre & Washington Streets

Muskevich's - Ridge St. below Luzerne St.

Nowak's - 801 Schwabe St. (Stanley Nowak, proprietor) restaurant (age 41 in 1940 Census)

The Other Side - Centre St. (had once been Carsia's Bar) (From Bill Feissner: Carcia's Bar was sold to Ed Barna and became Eddies Bar. He bought the Eagles next door and made a large dining room out of it. He then retired and sold it to Jackie and Leanne Kochie, which is now The Other Side.)

Procopio's Pasternak's - Centre St., between Luzerne & South Streets

Potochney's bottling works - 20 N. Ridge St. (Michael Potochney, proprietor, 1890s, still in business in 1901; Alexander Potochney a business partner?)

Procopio's - 520 Ridge St. (Salvatore Procopio, proprietor) restaurant (1940 Census) (photo at right from John Zubach)

Ravina's - 413 Centre St. (Joseph Ravina, proprietor and waiter) restaurant (age 44 in 1940 Census)

Ravina's Cafe - 449 Ridge St. (until the mid-1960s)

Remak's Bar on Main St. John Remak at his
                bar Remak's Bar - 709 Main St. (Michael Remak, proprietor - see photo at left, provided by Nancy Penn) (From Ed Merrick: The view in this photo at left is from the inside of Remak's, through one of two bay windows, which flanked the front door. The building to the left is, or would become, Gene Boyle's Cafe, on the corner of Main at Washington Street. The house to the right had been converted into a pharmacy when last I visited Freeland, and the upstairs had been converted into an apartment, which my aunt Irene (Remak) Corazza rented until her death in 2002.
John Remak at his
                bar The bay windows housed window seats, which could be closed off with folding doors. The bar itself was of dark, carved wood, and the ceiling was a classic tin tile pattern. Before TVs became widespread, my grandmother would allow the patrons to crowd into the living room, just beyond the bar, to watched the heavyweight fights of the 1940s, such as the Joe Louis and Billy Conn battles, but, as soon as the fights were over, they had to clear out and go back to their Stegmaier. Judging from the car on the street, I would say the photo dates to the 1930s. ) (And again from Ed Merrick: This photo shows my my uncle, John Remak, in March 1966 behind the bar of his cafe on Main Street. A later photo in color also comes from Ed.)

Resuta's and
                Machella's Bar Resuta's & Machella's - 302 Centre St. (John Machella, proprietor) restaurant (age 41 in 1940 Census) (From Charlie Rudewick: It had the letter M on one side of the door and an R on the other. My Dad always said it used to be the "Miner's Restaurant" ...) (CT: It's Miner's Restaurant in the 1952 phone book.)

Rocco's - 462 Centre St. (Rocco Amentler, proprietor) (From Chuck Tancin: I remember Halloweening in here with a friend. We sang Sue Thompson's "Sad Movies" and several people gave us coins, likely to keep us from singing the whole thing!) ; earlier, 457 Ridge Street (Rocco Amentler, proprietor), merchant, restaurant (age 28 in 1940 Census)

Rustic
                Lounge The Rustic Lounge - Centre St., between Luzerne & Carbon Streets, formerly owned by Jabo Valkusky (From Bill Feissner: Marion's Restaurant became Jabo's Bar, then was sold by Jabo to an Indian named Mushie, and became the Rustic Lounge.) (From Mike Bobby: Jabbo Valkusky's bar was located on Centre Street near Carbon. My friend's father was a bartender in the early 70s. It was known as The Rustic Lounge in the late 80s and early 90s and run by an Indian gentleman from Bensalem, Pa. known as "Mushie" until his untimely death at the age of 53 in 1992. The building remained vacant and was gutted by a fire in Sept. 2000.)

S & S Bottling Works - rear 412 Washington (1940 city directory)

Slegeski's - 713 South St. (Ignatz Slegeski, proprietor and waiter) restaurant (age 48 in 1940 Census) (From Ed Merrick: Iggy Slegeski was coach at MMI when I was a student there.)

Surf Club - Ridge St. (Louie Cherone, proprietor)

Tip-Top Bar - corner of School & Hemlock Streets

Tony Nocchi's - Schwabe & Ridge Streets

Tony Nowak's - Birkbeck St.

Tuggles' Bar - Ridge & South Streets (Tuggles Broskoski, proprietor) (From Bill Feissner: Tuggles Bar at the corner of Ridge and South became Drozik's Bar, and is now an apartment.)

Turri's Cafe - 229 Ridge St. (Angelo Turri, proprietor) cafe (age 39 in 1940 Census) (also listed in '64 Minamek)

Zikes - 1131 Walnut St. (Julius Zike, proprietor) tavern keeper (age 47 in 1940 Census) (From Jolene Lavinka Szymanski: When my grandparents lived on Walnut Street, my grandfather would go to a local bar on down the street. The name was Zikes-the spelling I am not sure of. I remember the place well. It was connected to his home.)



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