Digital Humanities Literacy Workshop

Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation at Carnegie Mellon University.

Participants: please bring laptops, and check back here for updates.

The Digital Humanities Literacy Workshop at Carnegie Mellon is a 1-week course focused on providing humanities scholars with a broad overview of Digital Humanities (DH) research, introducing participants to a wide range of computational techniques and critical approaches for the humanities. The goal of the summer school is to create new understandings of how humanities scholars can computationally augment their research, allowing them to explore fundamentally different kinds of questions and equipping them to do so in ways that are relevant to the participants' own scholarship. After a combination of conceptual overviews and hands-on workshops, participants should have a good sense of whether digital humanities is an area they intend to pursue more thoroughly.

Scott B. Weingart (scottbot@cmu.edu), CMU's Digital Humanities Specialist, will teach the course alongside relevant guest speakers from CMU and other local universities.

Participants Will:

  • Understand the theory and practice of DH, including its history, the opportunities it presents, and critical issues in incorporating DH into humanities scholarship.
  • Develop an awareness of the technical and critical steps required to perform digital research.
  • Know where to go locally, globally, and on the web for further resources.

Topics:

  • Culture. DH research takes place in a different cultural world than much humanities research, which can be disorienting for newcomers. Topics such as DH history, ethos, and publication environment are included to introduce participants to DH culture.
  • World. Members of the DH community often describe it as a "big tent", encompassing many subjects. This summer school covers many such subjects, including digital history, digital literary studies, new media & cultural criticism, computational philosophy, digital arts & art history, public humanities, digital editions, and feminist digital humanities.
  • Methods. DH researchers are aligned in their interest in approaching humanities questions from many methodological angles. Methods covered here include visualization, statistics, text encoding, and network, geographic, & text analysis.

Evaluation:

Participants taking the workshop for a graduate stipend must turn in a collaboratively-written 3-page critical report describing a tool, technique, or project pertaining to the digital humanities, which will be evaluated as part of the course requirements.


Schedule

May 16-19th, 9am-3pm, Steinberg Auditorium & Breakout Rooms, TBA

Monday May 16

  • 9:00 Morning - Steinberg Auditorium (Baker A53)
    • 8:30 Coffee & Bagels
    • 9:00 Introduction (Richard Scheines)
    • 9:30 What are Digital Humanities? (Scott B. Weingart)
    • 10:15 DH in Art History (Alison Langmead)
    • 11:15 New Media & Digital Criticism (Weingart)
  • 11:45 Lunch
  • 1:00 Afternoon - Steinberg Auditorium (Baker A53)
    • 1:00 Access & Praxis (Elisa Beshero-Bondar)
    • 2:00 Algorithmic Thinking / Close & Distant Reading (Weingart)
    • 2:30 Building as a Way of Knowing (Weingart)

Tuesday May 17

  • 9:00 Morning - Steinberg Auditorium (Baker A53)
    • 8:30 Coffee & Bagels
    • 9:00 DH in History (Elaine Parsons)
    • 9:45 DH in Literature (Matthew Lavin)
    • 10:30 DH in Philosophy (Kevin Zollman)
    • 11:15 DH in Corpus Linguistics / Modern Languages (Na-Rae Han)
  • 12:00 Lunch
  • 1:00 Afternoon - Breakout Workshops, Must Pre-Register (Rooms TBA)
    • [Room TBA] DH in History (Elaine Parsons)
    • [Room TBA] DH in Literature (Matthew Lavin)
    • [Room TBA] DH in Philosophy (Kevin Zollman)
    • [Room TBA] DH in Corpus Linguistics / Modern Languages (Na-Rae Han)

Wednesday May 18

  • 9:00 Morning - Steinberg Auditorium (Baker A53)
    • 8:30 Coffee & Bagels
    • 9:15 Data in DH (Jessica Otis)
    • 10:15 DH Fellows & DH Fellowship (A.W. Mellon Fellows in DH)
    • 11:00 Collation (David Birnbaum)
  • 11:45 Lunch
  • 1:00 Afternoon - Breakout Workshops, Must Pre-Register (Rooms TBA)
    • [Room TBA] DH in History (Elaine Parsons)
    • [Room TBA] DH in Literature (Matthew Lavin)
    • [None Today] DH in Philosophy (Kevin Zollman)
    • [Room TBA] DH in Corpus Linguistics / Modern Languages (Na-Rae Han)

Thursday May 19

  • 9:00 Morning - Steinberg Auditorium (Baker A53)
    • 8:30 Coffee & Bagels
    • 9:00 Ethos, Politics, & Publication in DH (Weingart)
    • 9:30 Digital Libraries (Keith Webster)
    • 10:30 Public Humanities (Weingart)
    • 11:00 Humanities Visualization (Weingart)
  • 11:45 Lunch
  • 1:00 Afternoon - Steinberg Auditorium (Baker A53)
    • 1:00 Moving Forward & Further Reading (Weingart)
    • 1:30 DH Group Projects (for stipend participants)

Stipend Requirements

Participants taking the course for a stipend must attend the entire workshop. Participants will also be required to successfully complete a group assignment covering topics from the workshop.

Course Assignments

Participants will be required to turn in their group assignments a week after the course's completion (5/29):

  • A 1500-word (3 page) description and critique of a tool, technique, or project pertaining to the digital humanities. Assignments will be assessed on their understanding of the theoretical and technical underpinnings of the object of study, their evaluation of its overall goals and how it succeeds or fails in them, and their ability to suggest improvements.